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Indigenous artist's work that 'makes you think' on display at Wabano Centre

Carl Beam was the first contemporary Indigenous artist to have his work acquired by the National Gallery of Canada, and in 2005 he received the Governor General's Award in Visual and Media Arts.
CarlBeam
One of Carl Beam's pieces. Photo/The University of British Columbia.

The Wabano Centre is encouraging people to mark the national day for Truth and Reconciliation by viewing the works of Indigenous artist Carl Beam. 

Natalie Lloyd, the general administrator at the Wabano Centre, told The Sam Laprade Show on Sept. 20 that Beam was a residential school survivor and his work explores the relationship between Indigenous people and the government. 

Beam was the first contemporary Indigenous artist to have his work acquired by the National Gallery of Canada, and in 2005 he received the Governor General's Award in Visual and Media Arts.

"Unfortunately, he is no longer with us," she said. "But he's an extraordinary visual artist who I think is inspiring a lot of people who look at his style… it's a very interesting way of telling a story."

The showing, which features 29 pieces of Beam's work, is open and free to the public from Sept. 27 to 29.

"It's art that makes you think, and that's what truth and reconciliation is about," Lloyd said. 

Listen to the full interview with Natalie Lloyd below:

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