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Insurance claims expected to rise after deadly storm hits Ontario and Quebec

Anne Marie Thomas, director of consumer and industry relations with the Insurance Bureau of Canada, says it is too early to project insurance claim tallies, but that home, auto and business insurance will play a key roll in the recovery.
2022-05-22 storm 27.
Aftermath of the Ottawa storm that happened on Saturday, May 21, 2022. (Photo/Dani-Dube)

Insurance claims are expected to rise following a deadly storm that swept across Ontario and Quebec on Saturday.

The storm left at least 10 people dead and roughly 281,000 without power as of early Tuesday morning, with two Ontario communities under a state of emergency.

Anne Marie Thomas, director of consumer and industry relations with the Insurance Bureau of Canada, says it is too early to project insurance claim tallies, but that home, auto and business insurance will play a key roll in the recovery.

She says roofs, fences, cars and food waste will likely make up the bulk of home insurance claims, with additional living expenses such as hotels also covered under some plans should families have to temporarily decamp from damaged properties.

Thomas says extreme weather continues to highlight the cost of climate change to insurers and taxpayers.

The insurance bureau says severe weather caused $2.1 billion in insured damage last year, stemming in part from November flooding in British Columbia and summer hailstorms in Calgary.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published May 24, 2022.

 

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