Skip to content
live

The Queen's strong connection with Canadians

Canadians gathered in multiple cities to pay tribute to Queen Elizabeth II on Sept. 19 in local services and events following her state funeral in London earlier in the day. 
20220908QueenElizabethII02
Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II.

 

Millions people around the globe said goodbye to Queen Elizabeth II on Monday, Sept. 19 as a state funeral that drew presidents and kings, princes and prime ministers — and crowds in the streets of London and at Windsor Castle — honoured a monarch whose 70-year reign defined an age.

Canadians gathered in multiple cities to pay tribute to Queen Elizabeth II on Sept. 19 in local services and events following her state funeral in London earlier in the day. 

In Ottawa, a national tribute service at Christ Church Cathedral included prayers and memories of her many trips to Canada.

OC Transpo services were paused for 96 seconds after 1 p.m.

Bell tolls, moments of silence and brief pauses in transit services were observed Monday afternoon across Ontario in memory of Queen Elizabeth II as her official state funeral concluded.

In busy downtown Toronto, bells at Old City Hall began tolling at 1 p.m., with 96 tolls in total for each of the Commonwealth longest-serving monarch's years of life.

People paused briefly by the building to observe and record the bells. 

About 50 people gathered nearby to observe a moment of silence at City Hall’s Peace Garden, which was dedicated to the late monarch during a 1984 visit.

Toronto Mayor John Tory joined the small crowd of city councillors and members of the public.

He put flowers on a stone sign that marked the queen's visit to the city. 

The CN Tower was also set to dim at the top of each hour Monday night in memory of the queen. 

Canada and Ontario declared Monday a Day of Mourning to coincide with the funeral, and Premier Doug Ford encouraged people to observe a moment of silence at 1 p.m. "to reflect on the remarkable life and legacy of service" of the queen. 

Ben Weiss, with the Historical Society of Ottawa, told The Sam Laprade Show on Sept. 19 that the Queen played such an influential role in Canada's history, and recalled one of the Queen's most important visits to Canada. 

"There were 30,000 people gathered on Parliament Hill as she put her signature on the Constitution," he said. "The Queen was essentially granting Canada its final independence that day."

Weiss added the Queen's coronation in 1953 was a significant moment with the Canadian media. 

"It coincided with the first ever broadcast day of Ottawa's first ever television station and they purposely chose that day to go on the air for the first time," he added. 

Weiss said the Queen will always have a special connection with Canadians across the country. 

Listen to the full interview with Ben Weiss below: 

With files from The Canadian Press and the Associated Press.

Rogers Sports & Media
2001 Thurston Drive Ottawa, ON, K1G 6C9
© 2006-2022 Rogers Sports & Media. All rights reserved.
push icon
Be the first to read breaking stories. Enable push notifications on your device. Disable anytime.
No thanks